Specimen Information

Pylodictis olivaris
Pylodictis olivaris
(Flathead Catfish)
Fishes
Native Transplant

Specimen ID164484
GroupFishes
GenusPylodictis
Speciesolivaris
Common NameFlathead Catfish
StateNC
CountyCumberland
LocalityCape Fear River near Fayetteville
Mapping AccuracyAccurate
HUC8 NameUpper Cape Fear
HUC8 Number03030004
HUC10 NameCross Creek-Cape Fear River
HUC10 Number0303000407
HUC12 NameLocks Creek-Cape Fear River
HUC12 Number030300040707
Map
+
Collection Year1966
Year AccuracyActual
Potential Pathwaystocked for sport
Statusestablished
Reference 1
Ref. Number:1491
Author:Guier, C.R., L.E. Nichols, R.T. Rachels.
Date:1981
Title:Biological investigation of flathead catfish in the Cape Fear River.
Journal:Proc. Annual Conference S.E. Assoc. Fish & Wildl. Agencies
Volume:35
Pages:607-621
Reference 2
Ref. Number:16054
Author:Pine, W.E, III, T.J. Kwak, D.S. Waters, and J.A. Rice
Date:2005
Title:Diet selectivity of introduced flathead catfish in coastal rivers.
Journal:Transactions of the American Fisheries Society
Volume:134
Pages:901-909
Reference 3
Ref. Number:14432
Author:Center for Marine Science, University of North Carolina, Wilmington.
Date:2004
Title:Nonnative fishes of the Cape Fear River system.
Publisher:Center for Marine Science, University of North Carolina, Wilmington.
CommentsThere is a strong indication that the introduction of this species has led to the severe decline of our native catfish populations.
Record TypeLiterature
Earliest Recorddrainage
Freshwater/MarineFreshwater
Number Stocked11
Specimen ImpactIn 1966 the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission introduced the flathead catfish (Pylodictis olivaris) to the Cape Fear River in an attempt to create a trophy fishery (Moser and Roberts 1998). Within 15 years of their introduction, the flathead catfish was found to be the most abundant catfish by weight and considered to be the new dominant predator in the Cape Fear (Guier et. al. 1981). Guier's study in the late 1970's showed that fish (99.4% by weight) were the principle prey of P. olivaris. Catfishes were the dominant fish found in the flathead's diet (Guier et al. 1981, Ashley et al. 1989). This is a strong indication that the introduction of this species has led to the severe decline of our native catfish populations.


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The data represented on this site vary in accuracy, scale, completeness, extent of coverage and origin. It is the user's responsibility to use these data consistent with their intended purpose and within stated limitations. We highly recommend reviewing metadata files prior to interpreting these data.

Citation information: U.S. Geological Survey. [2019]. Nonindigenous Aquatic Species Database. Gainesville, Florida. Accessed [7/23/2019].

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