Specimen Information

Oreochromis mossambicus
Oreochromis mossambicus
(Mozambique Tilapia)
Fishes
Exotic

Specimen ID164748
GroupFishes
GenusOreochromis
Speciesmossambicus
Common NameMozambique Tilapia
StateAZ
CountyCochise
Localitysprings in The Nature Conservancy's Ramsey Canyon Preserve in the Huachuca Mountains
Mapping AccuracyAccurate
HUC8 NameUpper San Pedro
HUC8 Number15050202
HUC10 NameBanning Creek-San Pedro River
HUC10 Number1505020206
HUC12 NameCarr Canyon
HUC12 Number150502020605
Map
+
Collection Year1982
Year AccuracyActual
Potential Pathwayescaped captivity aquaculture
Statusestablished
Reference 1
Ref. Number:14843
Author:U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
Date:1997
Title:U.S. FISH & WILDLIFE ANNOUNCEMENT THAT FIVE SPECIES HAVE BECOME EXTINCT WHILE WAITING FOR ENDANGERED SPECIES ACT PROTECTION.
Journal:Federal Register
Volume:62
Issue:182
Pages:49191-49193
CommentsIn 1982, the California Department of Fish and Game issued an aquaculture permit to the landowner of the California site to rear Mozambique tilapia (Oreochromis mossambica). Inadequate screening of the rearing facilities allowed tilapia to escape into the spring system.
Record TypeLiterature
Earliest Recordlocale
Freshwater/MarineFreshwater
Specimen ImpactThe High Rock Spring tui chub (Gila bicolor ssp.), a small minnow, was historically known from three formerly connected spring systems in California and Nevada. This fish was extirpated from the two sites in Nevada as a result of increased pumping of groundwater adjacent to the surface pools it inhabited. In 1982, the California Department of Fish and Game issued an aquaculture permit to the landowner of the California site to rear Mozambique tilapia (Oreochromis mossambica). Inadequate screening of the rearing facilities allowed tilapia to escape into the spring system. By 1989, the High Rock Spring tui chub was extirpated from the site as a result of competition from and predation by the introduced tilapia. The High Rock Spring tui chub was confirmed to be extinct in 1993. Because it is considered extinct, the High Rock Spring tui chub is being removed from the list of candidate taxa.


Disclaimer:

The data represented on this site vary in accuracy, scale, completeness, extent of coverage and origin. It is the user's responsibility to use these data consistent with their intended purpose and within stated limitations. We highly recommend reviewing metadata files prior to interpreting these data.

Citation information: U.S. Geological Survey. [2020]. Nonindigenous Aquatic Species Database. Gainesville, Florida. Accessed [2/26/2020].

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