Cyprinella lutrensis
Cyprinella lutrensis
(Red Shiner)
Fishes
Native Transplant

8 results for Cyprinella lutrensis (Red Shiner)

Impact ID Scientific Name Impact Type Study Type Study Location Impact Description Reference
2078 Cyprinella lutrensis Competition Anecdotal Field Red Shiner is implicated in the decline of the native fish of this region, including Spikedace... 217
2079 Cyprinella lutrensis Competition Anecdotal Field Establishment of Red Shiner has led to the decrease in Woundfin (Plagopterus... 1104
2080 Cyprinella lutrensis Competition Anecdotal Field Establishment of Red Shiner has led to the decrease of Spikedace (Meda fulgida 798
2081 Cyprinella lutrensis Competition Observational Field Red Shiner affect the growth, condition, or survival of young Colorado Pikeminnow (Ptychocheilus... 998
2082 Cyprinella lutrensis Competition Experimental Laboratory Red Shiner are competing for food with young Colorado Pikeminnow (Ptychocheilus Lucius) . 1444
2107 Cyprinella lutrensis Competition Anecdotal Field Redside Shiner (Richardsonius balteatus) declined when the Red Shiner became common in the... 952
2108 Cyprinella lutrensis Competition Anecdotal Field In degraded streams in Georgia, introduced Red Shiners have become one of the most abundant species. 1511
2109 Cyprinella lutrensis Competition Anecdotal Field Red Shiners made up nearly 50% of the catch per unit effort in Colorado and Green Rivers adjacent... 882

View all impact types for Cyprinella lutrensis
Data Disclaimer: These data are preliminary or provisional and are subject to revision. They are being provided to meet the need for timely best science. The data have not received final approval by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and are provided on the condition that neither the USGS nor the U.S. Government shall be held liable for any damages resulting from the authorized or unauthorized use of the data.

Disclaimer:

The data represented on this site vary in accuracy, scale, completeness, extent of coverage and origin. It is the user's responsibility to use these data consistent with their intended purpose and within stated limitations. We highly recommend reviewing metadata files prior to interpreting these data.

Citation information: U.S. Geological Survey. [2022]. Nonindigenous Aquatic Species Database. Gainesville, Florida. Accessed [5/20/2022].

Contact us if you are using data from this site for a publication to make sure the data are being used appropriately and for potential co-authorship if warranted.

For general information and questions about the database, contact Wesley Daniel. For problems and technical issues, contact Matthew Neilson.